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Travel Stories Podcast

Bringing you stories of wonder and adventure, crafted with sound effects and a musical score, Travel Stories Podcast seeks to inspire. From the seasoned adventurer to the wanderluster alike, travelers in over 150 countries tune into Travel Stories Podcast each week for inspirational stories and interviews.
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Now displaying: April, 2016
Apr 29, 2016
The Camino De Santiago is comprised of many pilgrimage routes, some starting in France, others in Portugal, Spain and many other places- but all ending up at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain.
 
Many travelers walk these routes and do this pilgrimage, and after finishing, all are left with amazing stories, moments and serendipity that made the pilgrimage one of the most important journeys of their life. 
 
Our guests for this episode, Craig and Linda Martin from the Indie Travel Podcast are here to tell us about their many journeys on the Camino. Their story goes into the fellow travelers they met on the way, the unexpected occurrences and the actual act of walking that far every single day. Along with a token electrocution, handled brilliantly by Craig.
 
As always, they are accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with Craig and Linda.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a relatively new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk (I answer everything)
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
Indie Travel Podcast: www.indietravelpodcast.com
ITP on Twitter: @indietravel
Apr 27, 2016
5 Language Learning Tips 
 
  1. They Probably Speak English
 
You are very lucky. Just by the fact that you’re comprehending this sentence, you’ve won the language lottery and speak English. Well, if you say ‘brought’ instead of ‘bought’, ‘a whole nother’ and ‘could care less’, then you’re a little behind, but don’t go worrying about that. 
 
How many times have you studied the language of the country you’re in just before heading outside, repeating the phrase you want to ask over and over in your head so you don’t forget it, only to get the response of “Yeah, just head down this road and take a left” to your masterfully pronounced line.
 
Most people you’ll encounter will speak English. 
 
However, don’t use this as your excuse. Don’t be that guy. People who speak other languages, regardless of their proficiency in English really appreciate it when you’re giving it a go. Even if you ask if you can buy seven million kilos of rice, instead of just seven (which is still a little much if you ask me), it’s the polite, courteous thing to do and it shows that you respect the way that they do things. 
 
  1. Key Phrases
 
This is where phrasebooks can be great tools. 
 
So when I get to a new country, the first thing I learn is the number system- the numbers one to a billion (totally necessary in countries with a ridiculous currency). Sounds like a lot right? Well, think about it. 1-10. How the teens work, how the multiples of ten work, 100. 1000. 1,000,000, 1,000,000,000. That’s about 16 things to remember, and you’ve nailed the number system. 
 
After that, just think about what you’re going to be doing with your time? If you’re doing a lot of market-hopping, learn the words for “How much?”, “Nah mate, that’s far too expensive” and “I wasn’t born yesterday”. Spending a lot of time bungee jumping? Learn phrases like “Are you sure this thing is tied on?” and “Arghhh why did I decide to do this??”. If you’re in Brazil, that one’s “Ayy, por que eu decidir fazer isso??” You’re welcome.  
 
But realistically, you can get by for 80% of life in that country with 20% of the vocabulary. (Big love to Mr. Pareto for that one). So as long as you’ve got your everyday encounters sorted, and the activity specific vocab, who cares if your grammar sucks?
 
  1. Body Language
 
Have you ever been on a balcony, looking down onto a situation that you just know is a breakup. You can tell. We’re smart, man. We can tell what people are saying without even hearing them. Use this! Head onto the interwebz, watch some youtube videos of Czech body language, Cuban body language, find out what it’s all about. 
 
Stick your tongue out at someone in tibet, don’t make too much eye contact in certain parts of Asia and Africa, and wave your arms about in Italy to express… anything at all.
 
  1. Films
 
Want a good way to stick this all together and see it in action? Check out some films. Dissect what they’re doing, how they’re saying things, what you understand from the situation- and you will be a lot more prepared when you’re in that country. 
 
I’d suggest a first time with subtitles, then a second without. The first will get you translating in your head, and understanding how they express certain things, and the second time will get you trying to get a feel for what they’re saying without the use of vocabulary knowledge- a skill which you will definitely need if you’re still a novice. 
 
I wouldn’t try to use what you see in the films too much. Characters in films are characters. Imagine meeting a Chinese guy who used this method by watching only Ace Ventura. That. Would. Be. Awesome.
 
  1. Speaking With Native Speaker
 
This has been totally invaluable to me, specifically. Even if you just practice the things you know you’ll need, speaking with a native speaker ups your game from Joey Nobody to Michael Jordan. Or, at least a high school player. Well, the guy that was picked last for the team. But still!
 
No, this isn’t going to seamlessly transition into an advert for a certain new online system so they give me the money I need to get my car a new alternator- what I would suggest is googling ‘The Mixxer’ - where you put in “I speak English, and I want to learn/practice Portuguese”. About an hour later, Maria from Sao Paulo who wants to practice English will be in touch. Now you can either go on Skype, or- my personal favourite- is to do it on WhatsApp. Then you can send Maria a voice message saying “Oi… vôce.. quero fala… comigo?”, to which she’ll reply. “Vôce quer fala! Seu Português é muito rum!” and you’ll be sufficiently embarrassed.
 
If you do all these things, not only will you be able to say things you’ll be saying every day, navigate whatever activities you’ll be doing and be able to know when someone wants to let you know something without telling you, but you’ll also know that Maria thinks your Portuguese sucks, but also loves that you’re trying and is patient with you. 
 
Which is what you should be with yourself. It’s hard. But it’s worth it. Don’t be that guy. 
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk (I answer everything)
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
Apr 25, 2016
Have you ever had a moment while travelling that makes you think about life differently? I’m talking near death experiences, things that put everything in perspective. When you can see how giant and unforgiving nature is, or how small and insignificant life is, whilst at the same time being so vast and complex, it really makes you think.
 
Our guest for this episode, Dr. Paul Johnson blogs at A Luxury Travel Blog, and tells us about a time he was studying for his Glaciology Phd, in one of the most unforgiving, barren areas of land in the world; Greenland, where he learnt a lot more than glaciology- he learnt about the unpredictable nature of… nature, and how he was nearly in the wrong place at the wrong time. 
 
As always, he is accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with Paul.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk (I answer everything)
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
A Luxury Travel Blog: www.aluxurytravelblog.com
Paul on Twitter: @luxury__travel (two underscores!)
Apr 20, 2016
6 Tips on Finding Your Way Around While Traveling 
 
  1. Couchsurfing
 
- This tip is really a two for one. Firstly, you’ll know all of the areas in the place you’re in in no time, and secondly, you get to feel special when you type in “I’m going to be here on this day!” and ten people send you messages all “Let me hang out with you!!” 
 
So last year I was in Saigon, and I did this- put on that I’m already there, got the messages, felt special. Then when I came down from my ego high, I replied to the first one. Within 30 minutes the girl I’d been talking to turned up at our meeting place, gave me a helmet and took me everywhere. 
 
It was a great way to find out where everything was, as well as ask her literally every question I could think of. 
 
  1.  Google Maps
 
- So the reason I was in Saigon was that I was about to start a solo motorbike journey from the Mekong Delta in the South of Vietnam through the country and up to Hanoi. Instinct was my map and the road was my compass. Then when I would arrive at the end of a road after riding down it for a few hours, I realised that instinct is a terrible map and the road being a compass just doesn’t make any sense, and I turned to Google Maps. 
 
Two things about this- firstly, you can use this without a data pack. Because it works on the GPS, and not the 3G (or 4G for you space age guys), you can be stuck in the middle of an African swamp and you’re fine. Well, obviously you’re not fine, you’re more like Atreyu’s horse in the NeverEnding Story, but at least you know where it’s all going down. 
 
Now when I say it works without 3G - directions don’t. You can’t search for a place. But that little blue dot that signifies where you are- that’s essential.
 
Finally, with Google Maps, don’t forget. Zoom. You zoom that guy right in there, because every time you don’t zoom, they build an uncrossable river on the road you’re on that you would have seen if you’d just zoomed. Yeah they build a river. It’s a lot of work but it teaches you a lesson.
 
  1. Find a hard copy map
 
- You don’t want to rely on technology if you’re lost. Get yourself a hard copy of a map, even if it’s a simple one from a little shop that has monuments and places of interest. it’ll take some orienteering skills, but you’ll be in much better shape to get where you need to go, even if it’s “past the big triangle thing, across the road shaped like the nike symbol and through something that looks grassy…"
 
  1. Learn how to use a compass
 
- So you’re phone’s bust. You’re in the rainforest in the wet season. You’re up a mountain and your hard copy map from that little shop blew away. It’s compass time. Even if all it tells you is North is, that’s so much more information than you were working with about 10 or 11 seconds ago, running after your map as the breeze claimed it as one of it’s own. 
 
Think on a big scale if you have to. “Right, if North is that way, that means the beach is over there, and over the other way is just more jungle. Let’s go that way.” 
 
Even if you have to go on a bigger scale- “Right, I’m in the rockies and I live in New York. East it is.” Good pair of shoes and a protein bar and you’ll be home in no time. 
 
  1. Ask the locals
 
They’re not going to make fun of you. They’re not going to send you to a weird abandoned factory where their mate Jeff is waiting with a van. They’re much more likely to begin to tell you where to go, realise that you’re just nodding and smiling and offer to take you there. My rule is if you trust the vibe, and you trust the guy, go for it. Unless he says “Sorry I’ve just gotta get this… Yeah Jeff? It’s time."
 
  1. Don’t - Just Get Lost
 
If I were to have to condense this list into just one, it would be this one. Think about it, what’s the worst thing that’s going to happen if you can’t find your way?
 
You’ll have to book into a hostel that even the teenage clubbing backpackers wouldn’t stay in?
 
You can deal with that.
 
All the hostels are closed down, someone’s stolen your wallet, phone, map AND compass and you have to sleep at a bus stop propped up against a bin?
 
We’ve all been there.
 
A much more likely scenario is you’ll embark on a journey, a quest that never would have presented itself to you. You’ll meet your new best friends, you’ll do things you never would have decided to do by yourself, and you’ll have a ridiculous travel story to tell. 
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk (I answer everything)
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
Apr 18, 2016
Do you travel with your partner? What about a group of friends? Or maybe you’re like me, and always travel solo. 
 
Travelling with a partner or friends certainly has it’s advantages. Everything costs you half the amount, you know you’ll never get lonely and most importantly, people are much more likely to believe your ridiculous stories.
 
Our guest for this episode, LeAnna Brown is one half of the travelling couple responsible for Economical Excursionists - a site where they share their travel journey and discuss many of the topics that we do in this episode:
 
- We delve into travel hacking, and how you can travel on a budget, and sometimes even travel for free. 
- Frequent flyer miles - how do you use them? How do you get them? 
- Travelling with kids
 
… and of course, LeAnna brings us an awesome story from her trip with her husband, Andy, to the Czech Republic. 
 
As always, she is accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with LeAnna.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk (I answer everything)
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
FLYER MILER: www.flyermiler.com
EE ON TWITTER: @EconExcursion
 
Apr 14, 2016
How many people do we meet in our lifetime? What about on our travels? Sure, we see them as strangers- they have the potential to hurt us and cause danger. But they also have the potential to bring us the most magical times, wonderful adventures and deepest connections.
 
Our guest for this episode, Sammy Del Ciotto asks the question "What would the world be like if we were all that little bit more trusting?” - And gives us some insight from her travelling to Bali, Indonesia, where she learnt the true value of trusting strangers.
 
As always, she is accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with Sammy.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk
WEBSITE: www.travelstoriespodcast.com
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/travelstoriespodcast
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
www.SammyDelCi.com
Sammy on Twitter/Instagram: @sammydelci
Apr 11, 2016
As travellers, we take chances. We go to the places we want to go to, do the things we want to do, and say ‘Yes!’ to everything. But is there one thing you’ve been meaning to do, one place you’ve always wanted to travel to, but you’ve been putting it off? What happens when it’s too late? 
 
Our guest for this episode, Michael o’Neal from the Solopreneur Hour & The Hines Ward Show was faced with this decision. He shares with us how he handled it, in true Solopreneur style, by making things happen. 
 
As always, he is accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with Michael.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk
WEBSITE: www.travelstoriespodcast.com
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/travelstoriespodcast
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
Solopreneur Hour on iTunes
Solpreneur Hour online: www.solohour.com
Michael on Twitter & Snapchat: @solohour
Apr 7, 2016
What affects you most about travelling? Is it the smells, the tastes, the sounds? Or is it the sights? As travellers, we cannot help but reminisce to those awe-inspiring views that our eyes have had the good fortune to gaze upon, and their memory never fades.
 
Our guest for this episode, Jackie Nourse (Formerly Laulainen) from the Budget Minded Traveler and TravelingJackie.com gives us her insight into travel, with a fascinating story that will take you on an emotional journey. 
 
As always, she is accompanied by music and sounds that really allow the story to come to life and take us along the journey with Jackie.
 
If you enjoy the show and you’re on iTunes or stitcher, please subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Being a new show, it really does help out a lot, and we do appreciate it!
 
Get in contact:
 
EMAIL: hayden@travelstoriespodcast.com (I answer everything)
TWITTER: @travelstoriesuk
WEBSITE: www.travelstoriespodcast.com
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/travelstoriespodcast
INSTAGRAM: @travelstoriespodcast
 
Links for episode:
 
BMT on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/budget-minded-traveler-podcast/id847606288
Jackie’s Blog: www.travelingjackie.com
Jackie on Twitter: @travelingjackie
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